TPQ, “Turkish Foreign Policy in the Middle East” by CHP Vice-Chairman in charge of Foreign Relations Murat Özçelik

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Murat Ozcelik

The Middle East region is undergoing its most difficult time in this century. Iraq’s invasion has indeed caused widespread repercussions. The failure of efforts between Turkey and Iran to come to terms with one another in leading the developments in the region on a peaceful co-existence of different sects resulted in an increased polarization of the region. Turkey’s growing involvement in Syria together with the US and some Western partners, helped to generate a counter-bloc comprised of Iran, Russia, and China. When considered with their supporters in Iraq and Syria this is indeed a strong bloc. One may say there is a new cold war in the making in the Middle East. Much has been said, written, and speculated about the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), but it is clear that it will take a huge effort to uproot it from the lands it has occupied. It is a common perception in the international community that the AKP government assisted al-Nusra and ISIL and that Gulf funding was used in this process. This has caused considerable consternation not only in Syria but also in Iraq, and certainly in Iran and Russia. In this article, the author argues that Turkish foreign policy in the region has been on a downward slide since the AKP government gradually dispensed with secular principles. Today, the credibility of Turkish foreign policy has hit rock bottom in the region.

Please click here to download the full article

About CHP EU Representation

The CHP was founded on 9 September 1923, about one and half month before the proclamation of the Republic of Turkey. The first President of modern Turkey’s oldest party was M. Kemal Atatürk. Today CHP is a social-democratic party, member of the Socialist International and associate member of the Socialist Group at the European Parliament. The scope of the CHP bureau in Brussels is not limited to the bilateral framework of Turkey's EU accession process. Issues such as the information society, energy policies, social development, climate change, international trade and security are among the different focus areas. The EU-Turkey relations are about integration and need multiple, plural and horizontal channels of communication. The CHP supports and promotes Turkey's EU membership process also by being more present and active in Brussels The CHP's Representative to the EU is Ms Kader Sevinç who previously worked as an MEP advisor at the European Parliament and in the private sector.
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